Plate of nut free English toffee

Homemade English Toffee Recipe

December 13, 2017 by Michelle

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This homemade English toffee recipe is a family favorite. I can’t believe it’s taken me so long to post it for you all. I’ll share some of what I use in affiliate links so you can easily find and purchase them yourself. I earn a small commission if you do so.

Gluten free English toffee recipe

While I often share dessert recipes on my site, I fully admit that I generally eat a bit then I can walk away. English toffee, however, is my weakness.

If you put any in front of me, I just might eat it all. That alone is part of the reason I haven’t posted this homemade English toffee recipe before. Every time I make some, it disappears.

Homemade nut free english toffee recipe

This makes the perfect last minute unique dessert or gift. I make it all year round but especially just before the holidays.

When I got a request from our PTO asking for contribution to a sweets and treats table for staff, I immediately decided to make my English toffee recipe. I make mine without nuts, and it’s naturally gluten free, which makes it perfect for the six staff members I know have a gluten allergy.

Homemade English toffee recipe

When I saw this is a non-fussy and easy candy, I mean it. I whipped this up yesterday afternoon between chores, then plated it up for school.

I asked my husband to “accidentally” take a big plate of it to his classroom and bring some home. Once I dropped it off, I regretted not saving a single piece for myself.

I just got a text from him that the only evidence I had made this English toffee recipe was the tin foil cover he found in the garbage. By the end of second hour, everything was long gone.

The entire batch. Gone. He confirmed plenty of other food and desserts remained, but not my English toffee.

I almost cried before I realized I can easily make another batch of my English toffee recipe and save it all for myself.

Plate of nut free English toffee

Yes, this is making candy, but it isn’t hard, I promise. The only real investment you need to make it in a candy thermometer, which costs under $10. It’s not a fussy recipe, and it tastes amazing.

How To Make This Homemade English Toffee Recipe

Add the butter, sugar, salt, and water to a heavy pot. Turn your stove to medium and bring to a boil.

I’ve heard that you have to stir nonstop, and I’ve heard you can’t stir because it will cause your candy to be grainy. This recipe isn’t so fussy.

I let it heat then use a spatula to stir periodically because I can’t stand to just leave it alone. Once the sugar starts to change color just a bit, I add the candy thermometer.

I could add it right away, but I like the mixture to fully incorporate and start boiling first.

While you wait, prep everything else you need. Place a silpat on a jelly roll pan to contain the toffee. If you don’t have a silpat, use parchment paper. Chop your chocolate, as well.

Let the candy cook until it reaches 300 degrees, then pour the toffee onto the silpat in your jelly roll pan. Use your spatula to quickly pull the remaining hot candy from the pot to the silpat.

Smooth the toffee with your spatula and spread it to your desired thickness.

Give it a minute, then use a pizza wheel to score the toffee. Work quickly because toffee cools fast. You aren’t looking to cut the toffee, just leave an impression.

Use a pizza cutter to score toffee

Immediately top with your chopped chocolate.

Add chopped chocolate to warm toffee

Let the residual heat from the toffee melt the chocolate. Use a new spatula to smooth the chocolate over your toffee, and make sure you get all the way to the edge.

Smooth chocolate over toffee

Let the chocolate harden for an hour. To finish, lift one edge and gently break it along the line you scored. Continue breaking all your pieces.

Serve immediately, or place in a tightly sealed container and store on your counter for up to a month.

Tips to make your English toffee recipe better:

  • Don’t put it in your fridge or freeze – or outside if it’s cold. I learned the hard way that the chocolate won’t adhere to the toffee as well when you break it apart if you do.
  • Use a heavy pot. This ensures the heat distributes evenly and helps ensure your sugar doesn’t burn.
  • Use a larger pot than you initially expect to need. I use a 3.5 quart size because it does bubble up though not as much as many recipes.
  • As the candy cooks, the way it bubbles will change. The faster bubbles when water remains will slow and grow larger as the sugar cooks into caramel. Don’t panic!
  • With a quality pot, it retains heat, so I turn the heat off about five degrees before it hits 300 degrees. By the time I get the stove turned off and lift the pot to start pouring it, the candy finishes cooking.
  • I prefer to use a quality chocolate bar and chop it finely rather than chocolate chips because it melts more readily, but chips will work.
  • If your toffee cooled too much for the chocolate to melt completely, place in a 110 degree oven for five minutes.

Have you ever tried an English toffee recipe? What’s your favorite dessert?

Nut Free English Toffee

Nut Free English Toffee

Yield: 25 pieces
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Additional Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes

This simple recipe for English toffee is fuss free. It's a great candy recipe for beginners. It's gluten free and nut free. This makes a great gift or dessert - or just make some for yourself and enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 c butter
  • 1 c sugar
  • 1/4 c water
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 6 oz chocolate, chopped

Instructions

  1. Add butter, sugar, salt, and water to a heavy pot. Turn stove to medium and bring to a boil.
  2. Stir periodically if you choose, and add candy thermometer once the mixture boils.
  3. While candy cooks, place a silpat on a jelly roll pan to contain the toffee and chop chocolate.
  4. Cook candy to 300 degrees, then pour the toffee onto the silpat. Smooth the toffee with a spatula and spread it to desired thickness. 
  5. Give it a minute, then use a pizza wheel to score the toffee. Immediately top with chopped chocolate.
  6. Let residual heat from the toffee melt the chocolate. Use a new spatula to smooth the chocolate over toffee.
  7. Let the chocolate harden for an hour. To finish, lift one edge and gently break it along the score lines.
  8. Serve immediately, or place in a tightly sealed container and store on your counter for up to a month.

Notes

  1. Add butter, sugar, salt, and water to a heavy pot. Turn stove to medium and bring to a boil.
  2. Stir periodically if you choose, and add candy thermometer once the mixture boils.
  3. While candy cooks, place a silpat on a jelly roll pan to contain the toffee and chop chocolate.
  4. Cook candy to 300 degrees, then pour the toffee onto the silpat. Smooth the toffee with a spatula and spread it to desired thickness. 
  5. Give it a minute, then use a pizza wheel to score the toffee. Immediately top with chopped chocolate.
  6. Let residual heat from the toffee melt the chocolate. Use a new spatula to smooth the chocolate over toffee.
  7. Let the chocolate harden for an hour. To finish, lift one edge and gently break it along the score lines.
  8. Serve immediately, or place in a tightly sealed container and store on your counter for up to a month.

Recommended Products

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Nutrition Information:
Yield: 25 Serving Size: 1 piece
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 129 Total Fat: 9g Saturated Fat: 6g Cholesterol: 20mg Sodium: 48mg Carbohydrates: 12g Fiber: 0g Sugar: 12g Protein: 0g
This site uses an outside service for nutrition information. If you need exact details, please calculate yourself.

Homemade English Toffee Recipe - naturally gluten free and nut free dessert

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    Comments

  • Marisa Franca @ All Our Way


    Well, as I commented on Facebook, it’s dangerous standing between me and the toffee. I can resist lots of sweets but this isn’t one of them I can see why everyone wiped your plate clean. Let me know when you’re making another batch.

    • Michelle


      I’m doing a sweets-a-thon with my kids this weekend, and I’m pretty sure toffee will be on it. I’m already chopping chocolate to make peppermint chocolate shortbread, so why not?

  • Jolina


    I love this recipe. I don’t have a lot of experience making candy but you’ve provided lots of detailed instructions I think I can do it! In fact I cannot wait to make some. It looks delicious!!

    • Michelle


      Go for it! You can totally make this. I’ve never had this recipe fail on me! (Knock on wood!)

  • Arlene Mobley


    I love easy homemade holiday gifts like this.

    • Michelle


      I’m right there with you. And the non bakers think it’s this HUGE thing 😉 I just think it’s a nice way to show love.

  • Veena Azmanov


    I have a love hate relationship with anything toffee. I can never stop eating it. This one looks so simple to make – much easier than mine lol. Might try it for Christmas.

    • Michelle


      I feel the same way. I could eat toffee all day every day!

  • Denise Wright


    I wondered how you got such straight lined pieces! This looks delicious …. I’ve always love English toffee and I’m going to have to give this a try for my in laws!

    • Michelle


      Scoring the toffee is a perfect sneaky hack, right?

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